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    Message Thomas Farrell

Thomas Farrell  ()

                 
Thomas James Farrell is professor emeritus of writing studies at the University of Minnesota Duluth (UMD). He started teaching at UMD in Fall 1987, and he retired from UMD at the end of May 2009. He was born in 1944. He holds three degrees from Saint Louis University (SLU): B.A. in English, 1966; M.A.(T) in English 1968; Ph.D.in higher education, 1974. On May 16, 1969, the editors of the SLU student newspaper named him Man of the Year, an honor customarily conferred on an administrator or a faculty member, not on a graduate student -- nor on a woman up to that time. He is the proud author of the book WALTER ONG'S CONTRIBUTIONS TO CULTURAL STUDIES: THE PHENOMENOLOGY OF THE WORD AND I-THOU COMMUNICATION (Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press, 2000; 2nd ed. 2009, forthcoming). The first edition won the 2001 Marshall McLuhan Award for Outstanding Book in the Field of Media Ecology conferred by the Media Ecology Association. For further information about his education and his publications, see his UMD homepage: Click here to visit Dr. Farrell's homepage.

On September 10 and 22, 2009, he discussed Walter Ong's work on the blog radio talk show "Ethics Talk" that is hosted by Hope May in philosophy at Central Michigan University. Each hour-long show has been archived and is available for people who missed the live broadcast to listen to. Here are the website addresses for the two archived shows:

Click here to listen the Technologizing of the Word Interview

Click here to listen the Ramus, Method & The Decay of Dialogue Interview

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Wednesday, August 31, 2016 (460 views)     

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Archetypes and the Fully Functioning Person Robert L. Moore, the Jungian theorist at the Chicago Theological Seminary, claims that each human person comes equipped with four feminine archetypes of maturity and four masculine archetypes of maturity in her or his psyche. Therefore, the fully functioning person is one who draws on the optimal forms of all eight archetypes of maturity. But it is not easy to learn how to do this. So I will discuss how this process works.

Gerard_Manley_Hopkins_by_Thomas_C._Bayfield - detail-contrast Tuesday, February 16, 2016 (842 views)     

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HOPKINS, THE SELF, AND GOD is Ong's Crowning Achievement (Review Essay) The short but densely packed book HOPKINS, THE SELF, AND GOD (1986) is Walter J. Ong's crowning achievement. A Kindle version of it is now available at Amazon.com. So I'd like to take the occasional to write about it. The poetry of the Victorian Jesuit poet Gerard Manley Hopkins (1844-1889) is not everybody's cup of tea. But for those who are interested in his poetry and life, Ong's book repays careful study.

Tuesday, February 16, 2016 (970 views)     

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A Reply to Burl Hall's Nostalgic Article "Can a Verb Based Language Bring Peace to the Planet?" Burl Hall's article "Can a Verb Based Language Bring Peace to the Planet?" is deeply nostalgic. My answer to the question he poses in the title is, "No." But the title is not the only problem. Using Walter J. Ong's thought as a framework, I not only comment on certain points in Burl Hall's article, but also offer an alternative account of cultural history.